Looking for love this Valentine's Day? Find your romantic spirit animal for inspiration

There’s more than one way to woo a mate -- just look at the animal kingdom.

If you’re still not sure how to express your love this Valentine’s Day, it might be a simple as finding your romantic spirit animal. Use this quiz to find the courtship behaviors that best describe you and your inclinations -- then let your romantic spirit animal be your guide:

Do you like to decorate? Are you a little OCD about your living space? Are you drawn to fancy, shiny, colorful things? You might be a…

Bowerbird. When male bowerbirds are looking for a mate, they build a structure out of sticks and decorate it with brightly-colored objects.

Are you one of those guys who likes to puff up your chest and strut around? Do you produce a loud thumping sound -- with your voice or car speakers -- when attracting a mate? Are you drawn to those that do the same? You might be a…

Sage grouse. When it comes time to mate, male sage grouse strut around with their tail feathers fanned. They also inflate air pouches in their neck, which produce whistles and popping sounds.

Are you looking for a mate who will bring you a nice rock from the jewelry store? Or are you hoping to earn your sweetie’s affection with them same? You might be a...

Penguin. Among certain species of penguins, the male will bring a female a pebble as a courtship gesture.

Do you woo your love with a box of chocolates? Is a free, special dinner all you need to put you in the lovin’ mood? You might be a…

Nursery web spider. When wooing a mate, a male nursery web spider will offer food wrapped in silk web. The behavior, however, might not just be about earning affection -- males who don’t offer gifts have a higher chance of getting eaten themselves.

click to enlarge JOHN HARRISON
John Harrison
Are you already with the mate you want for life? Do you dance together? Sing together? Keep each other looking good? You might be an…

Albatross. Albatrosses are among the species that mate for life, reinforcing their bond through ritual dances, songs and preening.

Are you a flashy dresser with even flashier dance moves? Or are you attracted to the same? You might be a…

Bird of paradise. Birds of paradise have among the most varied and fancy feathers in the bird world. But when it comes to attracting a mate, it’s not just about what you’ve got -- it’s what you do with what you’ve got. Male birds of paradise have wildly creative displays where they show off their colorful moves in hopes of catching the interest of a female.

Are you a bit clingy? Do find relationships to be all-absorbing? Do you attract mates that contribute the bare minimum and just seem to be along for the ride? You might be a…

Anglerfish. Being so deep in the ocean, anglerfish don’t run into each other that often. So when a male finds a female, the male bites onto her and his body fuses with hers, providing sperm when it’s needed. Over time, he loses no-longer-necessary parts until he’s nothing more than a parasitic lump on her side.

Do you like be chased in a relationship? Are you attracted to a mate that plays hard-to-get? You might be a…

Squirrel. A lady squirrel will lead a group of interested males on a chase when she’s ready for romance -- the fastest one wins earns her affections and the right to mate.

click to enlarge The James's Flamingo (Phoenicopterus jamesi), also known as the Puna Flamingo, is a South American flamingo, named for Harry Berkeley James. It breeds on the high Andean plateaus of Peru, Chile, Bolivia and Argentina. It is related to the Andean Flamingo, and the two are often placed in the genus Phoenicoparrus. - It is a small and delicate flamingo, approximately 3 feet in height. Its plumage is pale pink, with bright carmine streaks around the neck and on the back. When perched a small amount of black can be seen in the wings. There is bright red skin around the eye. The legs are brick-red and the bill is bright yellow with a black tip. Immature birds are greyish. - James's Flamingo is similar to other South American flamingoes, but the Chilean Flamingo is pinker, with a longer bill without yellow, and the Andean Flamingo is larger with more black in the wings and bill, and yellow legs. - PEDRO SZEKELY
Pedro Szekely
The James's Flamingo (Phoenicopterus jamesi), also known as the Puna Flamingo, is a South American flamingo, named for Harry Berkeley James. It breeds on the high Andean plateaus of Peru, Chile, Bolivia and Argentina. It is related to the Andean Flamingo, and the two are often placed in the genus Phoenicoparrus.It is a small and delicate flamingo, approximately 3 feet in height. Its plumage is pale pink, with bright carmine streaks around the neck and on the back. When perched a small amount of black can be seen in the wings. There is bright red skin around the eye. The legs are brick-red and the bill is bright yellow with a black tip. Immature birds are greyish.James's Flamingo is similar to other South American flamingoes, but the Chilean Flamingo is pinker, with a longer bill without yellow, and the Andean Flamingo is larger with more black in the wings and bill, and yellow legs.
Do you feel more attractive to a mate when you’re hanging out with your friends and showing off? Are you attracted to the same? You might be a…

Flamingo. Male flamingos perform as a group when it’s time to catch a lady’s eye -- head turns, struts and preening moves combine in a mass mating dance.

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