Interactive exhibition documenting deaths at U.S.-Mexico border comes to WSU

click to enlarge Interactive exhibition documenting deaths at U.S.-Mexico border comes to WSU
This display, made up of information on toe tags of people who died trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, is part of an installation opening Tuesday at Washington State University’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Pullman.


Shedding light on the realities of the U.S.-Mexico border is the goal of an exhibit opening Tuesday, Jan. 17, at Washington State University’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Pullman.

“Hostile Terrain 94,” referred to as HT94, is a participatory exhibition in which volunteers record the names (when known), age, sex, cause of death, condition of body and location of recovery on toe tags of people who died trying to cross the border, according to a WSU news release.

The installation is meant to be completed with the community’s help over the spring semester, culminating March 2 when the project’s founder, anthropologist Jason De León, visits the campus.

A form for those interested in volunteering can be found at provost.wsu.edu/hostile-terrain-94.

The nonprofit Undocumented Migration Project created the exhibition to bring attention to the deaths, according to the news release, inviting the volunteers who write out the names to reflect on and stand in solidarity with the dead and their surviving communities.

Mental health information and crisis resources will be available at each workshop for participants, and an expert on race, culture, immigration and equity will be in attendance.

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU is located in the Crimson Cube on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium and the CUB.